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Wilderness Therapy

The family is essential to the progress a student makes.

To ensure the success of our students, Ashley Green as our Family Support Therapist offers additional support to families because we believe that the more work the whole family does, the more sustainable and meaningful the child’s work will be. Ashley’s role is to offer time and space for parents to process and share their feelings, reflect on and explore family dynamics and areas of growth, and get general information about the program and their child’s experience. The frequency and focus of this support is individualized to a family’s unique needs, from providing a safe space to process feelings, to helping parents strategize how to support other siblings at home. Blue Ridge offers a menu of family supports and resources so families have choices in what will work best for them at various stages of their process. Ashley works closely with your child’s therapist to truly offer integrated, whole family care.

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Finding Identity in the Wilderness

I discovered this incredible work by chance while searching through a listing of outdoor jobs on an online database in the summer of 2011. As a recent college graduate, I was neck deep in the angst of entering the job force. I had never heard of Wilderness Therapy before, and honestly, I remember feeling unsure if I wanted to do it or not. I pictured a boot camp where students just cried all day and yelled at each other as field instructors ran around saying things like, “take accountability for your actions!” or, “let the tears flow!” Nonetheless, something about it captivated my imagination. So I applied for a job as a Field Instructor and read every book about it I could get my hands on. As I read Shouting At The Sky, a book describing a writer’s personal wilderness therapy experience, I started to understand that this wasn’t like anything else I had ever heard of; it sounded compassionate, powerful, raw, even sacred.

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Group Psychotherapy and Working with Group Dynamics in the Wilderness

The Brilliance of a Circle and Nature: Working with Group Dynamics in the Wilderness

A group of people sitting in a circle in the wilderness is an image we can all imagine, have seen, and/or been a part of. It's a powerful image. Why is this such a powerful image? It is something that has been going on for centuries. There is inherent wisdom, not only in the act of sitting in a circle and being a part of a group but also in what the magical element of the wilderness provides to this already rich experience.

 

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Teens with Substance Abuse Develop Self Efficacy in Wilderness Therapy

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How many times have we seen someone we love refuse to do something without ever trying? In our hearts, we know that if they would just give it a try, there is a good chance that they would succeed. We may think, “They lack self-esteem or self-worth”' this is partially correct, but it is missing the most important part of the equation: Self Efficacy. Self-efficacy is one’s belief in the ability to accomplish a particular task. Self-efficacy differs from self-esteem, which is the respect one has for oneself; this is an important distinction when dealing with adolescents. For the pre-teen and teen population, the general confidence adolescents have in their ability to accomplish a task correlates directly to whether they are successful in that task or not. At Blue Ridge Therapeutic Wilderness we find it particularly true while working with individuals suffering from substance use problems.

 

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Why Blue Ridge Wilderness Therapy

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Blue Ridge Therapeutic Wilderness utilizes a therapeutic wilderness model: primitive living, ceremony, metaphor, and affinity for the beauty and spirituality of nature. This model lends itself well to natural and logical consequences rather than contrived, verbal, didactic therapy models. Adolescents in our program are removed from their comfort zone and immersed in a new culture, where therapists and field staff provide a small universe of lessons mirroring the larger universe in which they live.

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Problems with students when they join wilderness therapy

Adolescents struggling with a variety of mental health diagnoses, behavioral problems, developmental issues, learning disabilities, substance abuse/dependence, school problems and relational difficulties find effective healing at Blue Ridge.

The admissions team at Blue Ridge Therapeutic Wilderness is able to match your child’s unique circumstance to one of our niche groups and therapists specializing in a specific population.

Blue Ridge student population includes, but is not limited to, the following profiles, diagnoses, and conditions:

 

 

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Parent Workshop – January 11 & 12 in Clayton, GA

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At Blue Ridge Therapeutic Wilderness, we believe that respectfully addressing the family dynamics and improving communication between parents and children throughout the entire process is paramount. The family is essential to the progress a student makes.

Our next parent workshop is January 11 & 12 in Clayton, GA. These workshops are designed to be small to individualize the focus on your specific families.

  • Learn more about your child’s experience.
  • Understand and practice the tools they are using.
  • Learn how to identify the needs beneath the behavior and make a plan for your family.
  • Get support from and connect with other families.

There are times when the workshops can correspond to a visit or discharge, so feel free to talk with your field therapist about this as well.

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Finding Identity in the Wilderness

Tim

I discovered this incredible work by chance while searching through a listing of outdoor jobs on an online database in the summer of 2011. As a recent college graduate, I was neck deep in the angst of entering the job force. I had never heard of Wilderness Therapy before, and honestly, I remember feeling unsure if I wanted to do it or not. I pictured a boot camp where students just cried all day and yelled at each other as field instructors ran around saying things like, “take accountability for your actions!” or, “let the tears flow!” Nonetheless, something about it captivated my imagination. So I applied for a job as a Field Instructor and read every book about it I could get my hands on. As I read Shouting At The Sky, a book describing a writer’s personal wilderness therapy experience, I started to understand that this wasn’t like anything else I had ever heard of; it sounded compassionate, powerful, raw, even sacred.

 

read more

continue reading
1 visits |0 Comments

Finding Identity in the Wilderness

Tim

I discovered this incredible work by chance while searching through a listing of outdoor jobs on an online database in the summer of 2011. As a recent college graduate, I was neck deep in the angst of entering the job force. I had never heard of Wilderness Therapy before, and honestly, I remember feeling unsure if I wanted to do it or not. I pictured a boot camp where students just cried all day and yelled at each other as field instructors ran around saying things like, “take accountability for your actions!” or, “let the tears flow!” Nonetheless, something about it captivated my imagination. So I applied for a job as a Field Instructor and read every book about it I could get my hands on. As I read Shouting At The Sky, a book describing a writer’s personal wilderness therapy experience, I started to understand that this wasn’t like anything else I had ever heard of; it sounded compassionate, powerful, raw, even sacred.

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continue reading
1 visits |0 Comments

Parent Workshop – January 11 & 12 in Clayton, GA

dkamf-12-min-1080x675

At Blue Ridge Therapeutic Wilderness, we believe that respectfully addressing the family dynamics and improving communication between parents and children throughout the entire process is paramount. The family is essential to the progress a student makes.

Our next parent workshop is January 11 & 12 in Clayton, GA. These workshops are designed to be small to individualize the focus on your specific families.

  • Learn more about your child’s experience.
  • Understand and practice the tools they are using.
  • Learn how to identify the needs beneath the behavior and make a plan for your family.
  • Get support from and connect with other families.

View more details of this Event

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